Posing Wide-Open Risks to the Impressionable

Or, Social Media Responsibility (hint: there isn’t any.)

I support freedom of speech but I think social media platforms have an obligation to refuse to post content that can lead to or cause injury or death.  Laying it on the parents is only a partial solution.  Some kids, young “adults”, can misplace stupidity and adventure.

CNN  9.21.22

The FDA is warning about a rise in adolescents and young adults participating in dangerous social media challenges. One recent challenge posted on social media encouraged people to cook chicken in NyQuil and similar over-the-counter cough and cold medicines. “Boiling a medication can make it much more concentrated and change its properties in other ways,” the FDA said. The agency also pointed to a TikTok challenge daring people to hallucinate by taking large doses of the over-the-counter drug Benadryl.

The FDA cited reports of teens ending up in hospital emergency rooms or dying after participating. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents should talk to their children about social media dares and discuss them “calmly and without judgment” while encouraging them to think through any potential negative outcomes.

*****

Social media, it can pose wide-open risks to the impressionable.

***** S&E *****

Thoughts on how to be a player in your business…

(Or, acquiring a “seat at the table”…)

On the way “up”, partner with managers and leaders of other functions in the business.

Look for opportunities to participate in multi-functional teams and projects.

Manager and Leader tool box

Safe guard the policies of the business; if you have international locations, know what policies cross the border (some do), which ones don’t, and understand and communicate the differences when appropriate.

Establish objectives and measure performance to set objectives. If you have multiple direct reports, manage accountability. Pay for performance. Compensation needs to be relative.

Provide alternative solutions to partners that have or create issues. The former, proactive, the latter reactive.

Be an aggressive communicator, speak up!

Understand basic planning tools and software. Use analytics to support your positions on varying issues and subjects.

Safeguard the company’s values and “take no prisoners” when it comes to zero tolerance.

Manager and leader behaviors are visible to others. A “player” develops these, and needs to be an example: Some are inherent, some acquired through experience: integrity, professional presence, passion, leadership, teamwork, courage, humor, humility, analytical ability, planning, problem solving, performance management, decision making, inclusiveness and respect for differences, kindness, open door, intellectual rigor, risk taking, perseverance, and patience. (Not an inclusive list)

In the end “you gotta want it’ but not so much it becomes a detriment to others. You can get there, reach you career objectives, without leaving a trail of peripheral damage.

Leave ego elsewhere. Replace it with confidence and well-tuned manager/leader skills and behaviors. Be an example, mentor and coach.

***** S&E *****

How-to-get-better-at-speaking-up-in-the-moment

Many people can benefit from this one, from a Fast Company article August 16, 2022. Including myself !

By Stephanie Vozza (3 minute Read)

A lot of people struggle speaking up in the moment. Sometimes, it’s due to the fear of saying or doing the wrong thing and suffering repercussions. Or maybe it’s because they’re not prepared and are caught off guard in the moment. The problem with not pushing back is that you don’t address the problem, says Amber Cabral, author of Say More About That . . . And Other Ways to Speak Up, Push Back, and Advocate for Yourself and Others.

“Whatever the not-okay behavior, oppressive action, or inappropriate discussion may be, it will continue to go on,” she says. “It should be resolved or addressed by pushing back.”

Cabral defines pushing back as challenging an idea or position someone else had before. In the workplace, that can be something as simple as disagreeing with someone’s perspective. Or it could be a matter of trying to create space for your ideas.

“When you’re thinking about pushing back, that means that you’re trying to challenge something that has been presented that is inequitable or doesn’t consider all the information is available,” says Cabral.

How to Push Back

There is a wrong way and a right way to push back, says Cabral. “You may be living life through your eyes, but other people are experiencing it, too,” she says. “You want to recognize how things might land, because messaging that lands well is more likely to be effective.”

For example, if your ideas aren’t being heard and you’re not being given the space you need, Cabral suggests inserting yourself by asking a question, such as, “I can appreciate what you shared. Would you be open to a different perspective?”

“What that question does is it invites folks who are listening to say, ‘Oh, there’s another person,’” says Cabral. “They have to give you an affirmative or say no. When you pose a question, you’re ‘permissioning’ those who are in the room with you, asking them to shift to their listening ear. It’s also very non-confrontational; very inviting.”

Why It’s Important to Push Back

Pushing back is important for challenging things that are not equitable. You can make space for aspects of your identity that may not get the space that they deserve. A perfect example is that just five years ago, we were not having conversations about pronouns, says Cabral.

“The reason it’s happening now is that people chimed in and pushed back, giving us an opportunity to have a collective shift to our mindset and perspective,” she says. “Pushback is one of the ways that we move our culture, our identities, our communities—and our workplaces—forward because it introduces ideas that we may not have considered, and challenges us to be willing to evolve and shift to create more inclusive and equitable spaces.”

***** S&E *****

Fail-Safe Culture

There is a lot out there on creating and maintaining a great work culture that attracts (welcomes my be a better word), retains, and develops the various generations (various age groups) in the modern professional work force. Hundreds or articles in many forms of media.

One thing that is a certainty — all levels of management and leadership in the business are responsible for the culture in the business. They set the policies and they are responsible for business performance and employee morale and opportunity, and maintaining an environment that is based on values and integrity. And more.

Trust, Communications, Tools

So over the years, despite experts’ opinions on the work environment expectations of different generations of professional employees, consider the skills needed by the leadership and management team to create and maintain a fail-safe culture, highly desired by any generation. So easy to list, so challenging to internalize in an organization:

  • A leadership/management team that is understands and is committed to culture
  • Values are foundation blocks
  • Communications (Listening)
  • Individual Performance
  • Team work
  • Inclusive work force
  • Professional Development
  • Internal and external Community
  • Opportunity and Growth
  • Technology

It is not an insignificant list, nor is it inclusive. And, it is no small accomplishment to build a leadership and management team to take a business to a fail-safe culture. And here is a list of many of the competencies that the leadership and management team needs to command. No small undertaking…

Accountability,  Integrity,  Humor, Kindness, Common Sense, Communications,  Flexibility, Dependability,  Adaptability, Professional Presence, Business Acumen, Leadership,  Intellect,  Passion, Humility, Compassion.

***** S&E *****

A Chance to be famous…

Scientists are asking the public to name 20 exoplanetary systems observed by the Webb telescope. Here’s how to submit your idea.

Know that you will need a team to participate. The website below explains the rules and guidelines.


https://www.cnn.com/2022/08/18/world/webb-telescope-exoplanet-name-contest-scn/index.html?utm_term=1660905882232402a1077a60b&utm_source=cnn_Five+Things+for+Friday%2C+August+19%2C+2022&utm_medium=email&bt_ee=aaEFD%2FuR2AZW1OusdrJx7NUU%2FyhYK15K555dfHyliIEqiLYxxNwVN15mzVM4pBtb&bt_ts=1660905882235

The International Astronomical Union, the organization in charge of naming celestial objects, is launching the NameExoWorlds 2022 Competition to give the public a chance to christen some of the first exoplanetary systems to be seen by the telescope.

Know that the IAU wants this to be a collaborative affair, so participants must create a team composed of teachers, students, astronomy enthusiasts, or professional or amateur astronomists.

A chance to be famous forever….

***** S&E *****

Gen Z isn’t looking for a dream job. This from a CEO’s experience, Paul Hudson is the CEO of Sanofi.

Summarized from https://www.fastcompany.com/90772850/gen-z-isnt-looking-for-a-dream-job-heres-what-they-want-instead?partner=feedburner&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=feedburner+fastcompany&utm_content=feedburner&utm=newsletters

Born as digital natives with personal agency and facing a labor shortage, record class stratification, and untenable living costs, Gen Z has significantly shifted their concept of a career.

Top-tier talent is saying: “I’ll bring from day one my experiences, and I’ll help you be a better company. But I will leave at some point, and you should not be concerned by that. I will leave it better than I found it, but I will also leave better than I arrived.”

Employees want to feel like they are working for a company that aligns with their values and brings real breakthroughs to the populations it serves. Gen Z ethos of values, work-life balance, questioning the status quo, and seeking fulfillment and worth.

Gen Z, millennials, and others are demanding more from their employers: They want transparency, respect, empathy, sustainability, and support for continued growth and development.* They also expect real action from leadership on diversity and inclusion. This is the most diverse generation thus far in the United States, with only 52% identifying as white non-Hispanic, and 99% of those surveyed by Tallo rating workplace DEI as important.

There are four things business leaders at all levels need to keep in focus when encouraging their Gen Z employees:

Communicate early and often

Provide stretch assignments

Use automation and AI to support growth**

Create a listening culture

From this blogger’s experience, communications, stretch assignments, and listening are foundation blocks of great leadership, not new to the conversation; not to say those things are in the majority of many leader’s methodology. And automation and meaningful use of AI certainly can enhance challenging assignments, and professional experience and contribution.

***** S&E *****

* Describes a work environment sought after by those with ambition, talent, and runway. Not so new.

** Instead of having someone crunch numbers in an Excel grid, it’s better to designate that task for AI so the employee can spend more drawing insights from the data and creating solutions instead of handling menial, repetitive tasks.

Does this look familiar

Does this look familiar… both terrorizing free democratic countries.  Well, the world took care of Hitler…is it not time to rid the world of a second one.  It’s time! Here’s the letter to Putin, to be shared simultaneously with the Russian people by using whatever communications vehicles/media necessary.

President Putin,

The world has met and is giving you one week to withdraw from the Ukraine. Failure to do so? The world will drive you out of this free country.  Threaten us with a nuclear attack, the world will attack Russia and drive it into non-existence.

Maybe “Rocket Man” might see this too and take a step back to re-think his role in the world.

We sympathize with the Russian people who are losing family members at your behest.

You have one week.

The World.

***** S&E ****

Change

If you visit the “About” page of this site you will find its primary purpose is to help readers improve their performance and the performance of others.

I have found that I have strayed away from that “mission” and find myself posting more about the horrendous political, environmental, divisive, and corruption issues in the USA and around the globe.

I am tired of it. I feel that the negative “force” of these issues has caused the blog to stray from its original charter . And, there is sufficient, negative news out there without this blog republishing and commenting on it!

There IS content in this blog’s past postings over the years that addressed personal and work-related performance topics to assist with personal improvement.

I’m moving on to more enjoyable posting. I will not abandon the topic of “leadership” as I find it so elementary to everything.

7/26/2022

***** S&E *****

RECESSION VIBES

…just keep telling your friends there is no recession… and, there won’t be one !
Image
From CNN Night Cap. 7.25.22
Here’s the deal: Even the world’s foremost economists are scratching their heads right now. Why are consumers spending so much money but saying they’re pessimistic? How can the labor market be so strong while output is dropping? Are we in a recession, or headed for one, and honestly how are we even defining “recession” these days? “If you’re not a little confused about the economy, you’re not paying attention,” tweeted Jason Furman, a former White House economic adviser. 

In short: No one knows what’s going on, primarily because the pandemic took a wrecking ball not only to the economy itself but to the models that economists have spent decades developing to try to measure and report on, well, everything.  In the absence of certainty, speculation is running wild. That has some experts worried we’ll actually end up talking ourselves into a recession. 

Hear me out: There’s a pretty sound theory that the more we talk about the R-word, the more likely it is we’ll end up in one. It’s kinda like skiing down a mountain — the more you worry about running into a tree the more likely you are to bonk into one.  Even a casual reader of news — or Twitter or Instagram or TikTok — is, consciously or not, soaking up concerns about inflation and a looming recession. When that unease takes root, it changes the way we spend.  

If we believe rampant inflation is here to stay, we’ll lock in purchases sooner than later, which translates to higher demand and therefore higher prices … and so on. If we believe a recession is inevitable, then it hardly matters whether it’s technically a recession or not. When the vibe is off, the vibe is off. The White House is already trying to get ahead of potential bad news on the economic front this week, when the Commerce Department releases its initial report on second-quarter growth. In a blog post last week, officials sought to reinforce the idea that the definition of a recession isn’t as clear cut as you might think.  “While some maintain that two consecutive quarters of falling real GDP constitute a recession, that is neither the official definition nor the way economists evaluate the state of the business cycle,” the White House wrote. “Instead, both official determinations of recessions and economists’ assessment of economic activity are based on a holistic look at the data — including the labor market, consumer and business spending, industrial production, and incomes.”  

Translation: Even if the second-quarter data shows another contraction, that doesn’t automatically make it a recession. This is more than just a politically convenient fact for the Biden administration. In the United States, there’s an obscure cadre of eight economists who are in charge of declaring when we’re in a recession. And as my colleague Nicole Goodkind wrote recently, that group of eight known as the Business Cycle Dating Committee — which sounds like the worst matchmaking app of all time — abides by a relatively vague definition that allows for wiggle room: A recession, they write, “involves a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy and lasts more than a few months.”  It’s the economist’s version of Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s famed “I know it when I see it” test.

It is like, build it and they will come. In this case, talk about it enough and it will happen, either way!

***** S&E *****